Tag Archives: word up books

March 23: Book Launch: Desert Borderland by Matt Ellis

DESERT BORDERLAND: The Making of Modern Egypt and Libya (Stanford University Press, March 2018) investigates the historical processes that transformed political identity in the easternmost reaches of the Sahara Desert in the half century before World War I. Adopting a view from the margins ― illuminating the little-known history of the Egyptian-Libyan borderland ― the book challenges prevailing notions of how Egypt and Libya were constituted as modern territorial nation-states.

Matt Ellis is Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation Chair in Middle Eastern Studies and International Affairs at Sarah Lawrence College. Matt specializes in the social, intellectual, and cultural history of the modern Middle East, and his research addresses the relationship between nationalism, territoriality, and political identity in Egypt and in the late Ottoman Empire. Desert Borderland is his first book. Light refreshments will be provided and books will be available for sale.

Book Launch: Desert Borderland by Matt Ellis
Friday, March 23, 2018
6:30 – 8:30pm
Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032
Advertisements

March 18: Danielle Lazarin & Jessie Chaffee in conversation

Word Up is proud to present Danielle Lazarin and Jessie Chaffee—two authors, native New Yorkers, and longtime friends to Word Up—whose debut fiction explores the complex lives of women and girls.

Danielle Lazarin’s debut story collection, Back Talk, is peopled with women and girls defiantly pushing the boundaries between selfishness and self-possession. With a fresh voice and bold honesty, Back Talk examines how narrowly our culture allows women to express their desires.

Danielle Lazarin has won grants from New York Foundation for the Arts and the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance, the Glimmer Train Family Matters Award, and Hopwood Awards. She is a graduate of the writing programs of Oberlin College and the University of Michigan’s Helen Zell Writers’ Program. She lives in Inwood with her husband and daughters.

In Jessie Chaffee’s novel Florence in Ecstasy, a young American woman arrives in Florence from Boston, knowing no one and speaking little Italian. But Hannah is isolated in a more profound way, estranged from her own identity after a bout with starvation that has left her life and body in ruins. She is determined to recover in Florence, a city saturated with beauty, vitality, and food―as well as a dangerous history of sainthood for women who starved themselves for God.

Jessie Chaffee was awarded a Fulbright Grant to complete Florence in Ecstasy and was the writer-in-residence at Florence University of the Arts. Her work has been published in The Rumpus, Slice, Bluestem, Global City Review, and The Sigh Press, among other places. She received her MFA from the City College of New York, and she lives in New York City, where she is an editor at Words Without Borders.

Authors Danielle Lazarin & Jessie Chaffee in conversation
Sunday, March 18, 2018
3–5pm
Word Up Community Bookshop
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032

March 16: Word in the Heights—March Poetry Madness

Word in the Heights is a teen open mic for spoken word artists, singers, rappers, and others who want to share their voices and talents. Sign up to perform or come and enjoy a night of performances and music, by youth, for youth.

This Launchpad Arts Collective event is funded in part by Poets & Writers with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, as well as by Citizens Committee for New York City. 

Word in the Heights
Friday, March 16, 2018
6–8pm
Word Up Community Bookshop
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032

 

March 15: Participatory Workshop on Immigrant Rights: Dialogue in a Time of Crisis


Join us for a participatory workshop on immigrant rights by the authors of The Politics of Immigration, as well as an information session and update on the sanctuary at Holyrood Episcopal Church, where Amanda Morales Guerra and her children have been housed since August 2017.

We don’t want our family members, friends, and neighbors hauled away and deported. Many of us are actively working to defend community members from deportation, like Ravi Ragbir, leader of the NYC New Sanctuary Coalition, and Amanda Morales Guerra, who has been in sanctuary at Holyrood Episcopal Church in Washington Heights since August.

But do we really understand the system we are fighting against? Do we have the tools to respond effectively to tough questions from family members, co-workers, and others who don’t share our views? For example:

* Why do so many people come here “illegally”? Why don’t they just wait in line?
* If someone committed a crime in this country, why shouldn’t they be deported?
* Don’t unauthorized immigrants push down wages for everyone?
* Can we really afford to have so many immigrants here?
* Isn’t our current immigration system color-blind?
* What would an alternative system look like, and how do we get there?

Bring your questions and thoughts to this participatory workshop facilitated by Jane Guskin and David Wilson, authors of The Politics of Immigration: Questions and Answers (Monthly Review Press). Together we will strengthen our skills and deepen our understanding to engage more effectively in dialogue around immigration issues.

The sanctuary information session will be led by Renee Colwell, volunteer coordinator at Holyrood Episcopal Church, who will share with neighbors how they can help.

More information: thepoliticsofimmigration.org

Participatory Workshop on Immigrant Rights: Dialogue in a Time of Crisis
Thursday, March 15, 2018
6:30–8:30pm
Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria
New York NY 10032

March 10: Root Shock: Dr. Mindy T. Fullilove & Coach Dave Crenshaw in conversation

Join Word Up for a conversation between Dr. Mindy Thompson Fullilove—author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do About It (New Village Press)—and Coach Dave Crenshaw, on the effects of displacement on communities.

Like a sequel to the prescient warnings of urbanist Jane Jacobs, Root Shock reveals the disturbing effects of decades of insensitive urban renewal projects on communities of color. Fullilove passionately describes the profound traumatic stress—the “root shock”—that results when a neighborhood is demolished, and she demonstrates that urban renewal didn’t just disrupt black communities: it ruined their economic health and social cohesion, stripping displaced residents of their sense of place as well. Dr. Fullilove insists that understanding the damage caused by root shock is crucial to coping with its human toll and helping cities become whole.

Mindy Thompson Fullilove, MD, is a professor of urban policy and health at The New School, having moved there in 2016 after 26 years at New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University. Her research examines the mental health effects of environmental processes such as violence, segregation, and urban renewal. In 2004, she worked with colleagues in Upper Manhattan to start the CLIMB project, which has advocated for reinvestment in the area’s cliffside parks. This has spurred millions in new investment, including a 2016 $30 million investment to update Highbridge Park. Coach Dave Crenshaw is a youth sports coach and community organizer. His youth program—Team Dreamers, based at his first alma mater P.S. 128 in Washington Heights—trains up to 100 kids in athletics, life skills, and more.
The conversation will be followed by a Q&A with the audience. Books will be available for sale.
Root Shock: Dr. Mindy T. Fullilove & Coach Dave Crenshaw in conversation
Saturday, March 10, 2018 
4-6PM
Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria
New York NY 10032