Category Archives: Reading

September 21 – Poetry Reading w/ Dante Di Stefano & Nkosi Nkululeko

Join poets Dante Di Stefano and Nkosi Nkululeko in conversation at Word Up Community Bookshop. Dante’s books will be available for sale.

Dante Di Stefano is the author of Ill Angels and Love Is a Stone Endlessly in Flight. His poetry, essays, and reviews have appeared inAmerican Life in Poetry, Best American Poetry 2018, Poem-a-Day, Prairie Schooner, The Sewanee Review, The Writer’s Chronicle, and elsewhere. Along with María Isabel Álvarez, he co-edited the anthology Misrepresented People: Poetic Responses to Trump’s America. He holds a PhD in English Literature from Binghamton University and is the poetry editor for the DIALOGIST. He teaches high school English in Endicott, NY and lives in upstate New York with his wife, Christina, their daughter, Luciana, and their dog, Sunny.

Nkosi Nkululeko, writer, chess instructor, and musician, is a 2017 Poets House fellow. His poetry can be found in Callaloo, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Offing, Ploughshares, Third Coast, and elsewhere. Nkosi is a recipient of the 2019 Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts
fellowship, and is the winner of the 2018 Page Davidson Clayton Prize for Emerging Poets. His poem “Skin Deep,” formerly published by The Adroit Journal, was selected for The Best American Poetry 2018 anthology (Scribner, 2018). Nkosi Nkululeko lives in Harlem, New York.

Poetry Reading w/ Dante Di Stefano and Nkosi Nkululeko
Saturday, September 21,
4-5:30pm
Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032

Advertisements

September 20 – Paco Ignacio Taibo II, in conversation with Mariana Romo-Carmona

RSVP HERE

Paco Ignacio Taibo II, a distinguished historian and essayist from Mexico, was part of massive student protest in Mexico City in 1968 during which 200 people were killed by government troops, and many more arrested. The massacre has been omitted from textbooks and formal histories, still to this day denied by the Mexican government.

Taibo will talk with activist and scholar Mariana Romo-Carmona about his experience, taking the long view of the student protests around the world, and the way history is told, repressed, manipulated. An updated edition of his book, ’68: The Mexican Autumn of the Tlatelolco Massacre (español: El otoño Mexicano de la masacre de Tlatelolco) will be available for sale in English and Spanish.

Historian and essayist Paco Ignacio Taibo II, author of more than fifty books, is also renowned worldwide for his detective novels. His numerous literary honors include three Hammett Prizes, a Planeta prize for the best historical novel, and the Bancarella Prize for his biography of Che Guevara. In December 2018, Taibo was named director of the Mexican government’s national publishing house, Fondo de Cultura Economica, by the new Obrador administration.

Mariana Romo-Carmona (@piedrambar) is the author of Living at Night, Speaking Like An Immigrant, and Sobrevivir y otros complejos: Poems in Englillano. A longtime activist in the Latinx and Queer fronts, she produced and hosted the Connecticut LGBT radio program, “There is Another Alternative,” and co-founded Latina lesbian groups in Boston and New York City. She was an editor with Kitchen Table Press and co-edited Cuentos: Stories by Latinas; co-founder and editor, COLORLife! Magazine; editor-translator of Conversaciones; and founder-editor and translator of Escritorial Press. She has taught in the Latin American and Latino Studies Program at CUNY, and in the MFA in Writing Program at Goddard College, for many years.

THIS IS AN OFFICIAL 2019 BROOKLYN BOOK FESTIVAL BOOKENDS EVENT.

Paco Ignacio Taibo II, in conversation with Mariana Romo-Carmona
Friday, September 20, 2019
6:30–8:30pm
Word Up Community Bookshop
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032

September 18 – Reading: The Chasers by Renato Rosaldo

2019_0918_Rosaldo_Chasers
Renato Rosaldo’s new prose poetry collection shares his experiences and those of his group of twelve Mexican American Tucson High School friends known as the Chasers as they grew up, graduated, and fell out of touch. Derived from interviews with the Chasers and three other friends conducted after their fiftieth high school reunion, Rosaldo’s poems present a chorus of distinct voices and perspectives that convey the realities of Chicano life on the borderlands from the 1950s to the present.

The Chasers, by Renato Rosaldo
Wednesday, September 18, 2019
6:30-8:30pm
Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032
RSVP
Can’t make it? Purchase the book.

September 17 – World in Verse: A Multilingual Poetry Reading

Join Words Without Borders (WWB) and the American Academy of Poets (AAP) for a celebration of the 2019 Poems in Translation Contest winners, with readings by Mónica de la Torre, Jacob Rogers, and others.
Having received 717 poems from 282 poets from 87 countries translated from 55 languages WWB and AAP are thrilled to announce the four winning poems, which will be published in Poem-A-Day and in Words Without Borders every Saturday this September.
Congratulations to the winners:
1) “An Apocryphal History of the Discovery of Migration” by Alba Cid, translated from Galician by Jacob Rogers
2) “Tomboy” by Claudia Masin, translated from Spanish by Robin Myers
3) “Pillow” by Lee Young-ju, translated from Korean by Jae Kim
4) “Cloth Birds” by Dorothy Tse, translated from Chinese by Natascha Bruce
This is an official Brooklyn Book Festival Bookends event and is free and open to the public.
World in Verse: A Multilingual Poetry Reading
Tuesday, September 17, 2019
7-8:30pm
Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032

September 12 – Stephanie Jimenez, in conversation with Danielle Lazarin

Stephanie Jimenez will read from her debut novel, They Could Have Named Her Anything, followed by a conversation with Danielle Lazarin.

Every morning, seventeen-year-old Maria Anís Rosario takes the subway an hour from her boisterous and close-knit family in Queens to her private high school on the Upper East Side, where she struggles to fit in as one of the only Latina students—until Rocky welcomes her into this new life. White, rebellious, and ignored by her wealthy parents, Rocky uses her money toward one goal: to get away with anything. . . . A character in its own right, Jimenez’s New York City is full of contradictions, particularly its racial and economic segregation, the stark contrast of its struggling denizens and those extremely wealthy. Her renderings of these characters tell a larger story about the effects of gentrification and are, as Danielle Lazarin (author of Back Talk: Stories) writes of the novel, “a powerful reminder that moving between worlds is rarely free, and that the most valuable educations take place outside the classroom.”

Stephanie Jimenez, in conversation with Danielle Lazarin
Thursday, September 12, 2019
6:30–8:30pm
Word Up Community Bookshop
2113 Amsterdam Ave. @ 165th St.
New York NY 10032
RSVP